look out sunshine

here's the punchline

48 notes

fuckyeahretailrobin:

[Image Description: Background is several triangles in a circle like a pie alternating from true red, scarlet and black. A robin is sitting on his perch looking to the right.Bottom Text: “One Employee Shift Exception.”]
For anyone unfamiliar with this the “One employee shift exception” means that if you are the only employee on that shift you don’t need to be given a break. Even if the shift is say, 9 hours, like mine. Technically you need to consent to this. But I’ve never heard an employer ask anyone to consent.

fuckyeahretailrobin:

[Image Description: Background is several triangles in a circle like a pie alternating from true red, scarlet and black. A robin is sitting on his perch looking to the right.

Bottom Text: “One Employee Shift Exception.”]

For anyone unfamiliar with this the “One employee shift exception” means that if you are the only employee on that shift you don’t need to be given a break. Even if the shift is say, 9 hours, like mine. Technically you need to consent to this. But I’ve never heard an employer ask anyone to consent.

Filed under I used to do these all the time... then someone tried to sue the company so they had to stop I guess retail robin

282 notes

The much cited difficulties regarding putting Wonder Woman on film—Wonder Woman isn’t big enough, and neither are Gal Gadot’s breasts—aren’t chiefly about Wonder Woman, or comic books, or superheroes, or movies. They’re about politics. Superman owes a debt to science fiction, Batman to the hardboiled detective. Wonder Woman’s debt is to feminism. She’s the missing link in a chain of events that begins with the woman-suffrage campaigns of the nineteen-tens and ends with the troubled place of feminism a century later. Wonder Woman is so hard to put on film because the fight for women’s rights has gone so badly.

The Last Amazon: Wonder Woman Returns. (it is not currently behind a paywall, since I was able to read it.)

(via cacchieressa)

This article is important and valuable, and reveals Wonder Woman’s origin’s fascinating ties to early 20th century US feminism, Margaret Sanger, sexual politics, historical polyamory and bisexuality, and WWII.

“I have a message for you—a warning!” Washington says. “Women will lose the war for America! Women should not be permitted to have the responsibilities they now have! Women must not make shells, torpedoes, airplane parts—they must not be trusted with war secrets or serve in the armed forces. Women will betray their country through weakness if not treachery!”

Wonder Woman, watching from the side, cries out, “He’s working for the Axis!”

That being said, Gal Gadot is not “Gal Gadot, a lithe Israeli model.” She’s a model, yes, but in this context she’s an actress. Say it with me: act-ress. If you don’t like Gal Gadot in the Fast and the Furious franchise you should question your life choices.

Calling a woman a model shouldn’t be a put-down, but it this context it is being used that way, as shorthand that powerful WW is being portrayed by a mere pretty girl chosen for her face and body. Which would be ridiculous for Gadot even if she weren’t already an experienced actress — how many actresses proposed for WW are actual soldiers? How many taught physical fitness to soldiers? She’s tiny, yeah, but that doesn’t mean she’s not muscular.

I’m deeply annoyed that Gina Torres never got to play Wonder Woman, and Wonder Woman is a fantastic role for a less waiflike actress, someone larger, with more visually apparent muscle. Someone who finds it harder to get roles in the dickishness that is Hollywood. But that’s no reason to belittle Gal Gadot. She’s not who I’d have cast, either, but she’s not an anti-feminist choice in and of herself.

Now the fact that she’s a distant third in Batman movie number ninety billion and twelve? That’s the anti-feminist choice.

(via jadelennox)

(Source: cacchieressa, via skyvoice)

Filed under Wonder Woman